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A Challenge!

The other day, on Twitter, I set myself the challenge of designing and developing a Tumblr theme in one day:

This meant that I could not work on the theme at any point before or after the allotted time. I had never done anything like this before – I typically like to spend time making sure everything is looking good before I say it’s finished – so I had no idea how good the end product would look.

This process involved me doing three things, which were:

  1. Designing – A digital mock-up. I like to use Adobe Photoshop for this.
  2. Developing – This is the actual building of the theme. I like to use Adobe Dreamweaver.
  3. Testing – Arguably the most important part. This is where I needed to make sure that the theme was working on all browsers, and also that it scaled correctly on smaller devices, such as mobiles and tablets.

As you can see, there was a fair amount to do in order to say that the challenge had been a success, and to say that the end product is finished.

If I was to do this, I wanted to make sure that I did nothing out-of-the-ordinary in order to accomplish the task. So, I woke up at my normal time, and did everything that I would normally do in the morning. So, at about 9Am, I started work.

The first thing, as I have said above, was to mock-up the design. Doing this allows the designed to get an understanding of what he/she will be building when the time comes. Again, as I’ve said, I like to use Adobe Photoshop, so this is what I did.

There were eight things that I would need to design, which were:

  1. The Menu
  2. Text Post
  3. Photo Post
  4. Link Post
  5. Quote Post
  6. Chat Post
  7. Audio Post
  8. and Video Post

As I almost always do, I began with designing the menu. Doing this allows me to get a grasp of the size and dimensions of the rest of the theme, relative to the menu. This would be fixed to one spot, meaning that as the user scrolled, it would be constantly visible and accessible. The design for the menu, and also the area when the Posts will appear can be seen below.

01 Menu

 

As you can see, the menu of the theme is one left, and the area in which the content of the blog will appear is on the right, in a lovely shade of purple, I might add. After this, I needed to design the different Post Types. I’m not going to write about every one, as it is clear what they look like.

Text Post

02 Text Post

Photo Post

03 Photo Post

Link Post

04 Link Post

Quote Post

05 Quote Post

Chat Post

06 Chat Post

Audio Post 

07 Audio Post

Video Post – I pretty much always use Achievement Hunter videos in my mock ups. Both because I’m a huge fan of what they do, and also because it’s nice to have something good to watch when testing.

08 Video Post

 

The designing of the theme took me up to about 1Pm, which for me was great time. I usually take a week or more during this stage. Anyway, the next thing to do was the actual development of the theme. As I’ve mentioned, I like to do this in Adobe Dreamweaver, but really any text editor will work.

I only really came across one issue during this, which was the fixed positioning of the menu. I had never needed to have something that was fixed in one place, but also relative to the rest of the design before, but in the end I worked it out. But, to be honest, I’m not really sure how I worked it out. For this particular area, it’s a case of It works, but I don’t know why. 

The development stage took about three hours. Also here I was testing as I went along, to make sure that everything worked and displayed correctly.

A demo of this theme can be found here. It should be noted that neither the video or the audio are linked to the page, but one can get a sense of what they would do. Also, the link at the bottom of the menu section will bring you back to this blog. This is the only link that takes you anywhere, the rest are just for show.

That’s about it. I managed to designed and develop a desktop theme in one day. I’m currently looking to into putting it up for download, but if I were to do this, I’d want to refine a few things like, for example, the Tag and Clock icons not lining up correctly with the text to the right.

I said I developed a desktop theme because I didn’t have time to make it responsive (meaning that it displays correctly on every screen size), but, this is something I can work on if I were to put it up for download.

Thanks for reading, see you later.

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I Think This Might be a Regular Thing

I wrote about what I did on Friday, and it didn’t go too badly, and, more importantly, it was fun. It essentially involved my writing about all aspects of the day, from the point of which I went into school, to the end of the day when I sat down to write the post.

As part of my plan on getting better at written work, I would like to do this sort of thing everyday. It might be a push, because of the other work that I have to do, but it should hopefully pay off in the long run.

It’s still not decided if I would actually write the at the end of each day, or wait until the end of the week and post all five days (Monday to Friday) in one long post.

There may be one of these appearing tomorrow, there may not.

King Games

It’s more than likely that you’ve heard about King’s successful attempt to register the word “Candy” as a trademark. If you haven’t been following this case, it basically means that if another developer creates a game and the title included the word “Candy”, King can either ask them to change the name or appeal to have it removed from the store completely, be it Google’s Play Store or Apple’s App Store.

King are trying to stop another developer from using their idea. This is fair enough. If you’ve spent time and money creating a game, you’re going to want it to be yours, you won’t want anyone stealing it. But, they’ve conveniently glanced over one key fact.

Candy Crush Saga isn’t an original idea.

One wouldn’t be hard pressed to see Candy Crush’ similarities to CandySwipe. There’s also a chance that if your saw this in the App Store, you’d just assume that this was a clone of Candy Crush itself. But that is not the case.

CandySwipe

CandySwipe. The original Candy Crush Saga.

CandySwipe was created by Albert Ransom in the memory of his mother, and was released in 2010, a full two years prior to Candy Crush Saga’s release.

King have neglected to mention that their game is a clone of CandySwipe, but that hasn’t stopped them from attempting to sue Ransom. This led him to write an open letter to King:

Dear King,

Congratulations! You win! I created my game CandySwipe in memory of my late mother who passed away at an early age of 62 of leukaemia. I released CandySwipe in 2010 five months after she passed and I made it because she always liked these sorts of games. In fact, if you beat the full version of the Android game, you will still get the message saying ‘…the game was made in memory of my mother, Layla…’ I created this game for warm-hearted people like her and to help support my family, wife and two boys 10 and four. Two years after I released CandySwipe, you released Candy Crush Saga on mobile; the app icon, candy pieces, and even the rewarding, ‘Sweet!’ are nearly identical. So much so, that I have hundreds of instances of actual confusion from users who think CandySwipe is Candy Crush Saga, or that CandySwipe is a Candy Crush Saga knock-off. So when you attempted to register your trademark in 2012, I opposed it for ‘likelihood of confusion’ (which is within my legal right) given I filed for my registered trademark back in 2010 (two years before Candy Crush Saga existed). Now, after quietly battling this trademark opposition for a year, I have learned that you now want to cancel my CandySwipe trademark so that I don’t have the right to use my own game’s name. You are able to do this because only within the last month you purchased the rights to a game named Candy Crusher (which is nothing like CandySwipe or even Candy Crush Saga). Good for you, you win. I hope you’re happy taking the food out of my family’s mouth when CandySwipe clearly existed well before Candy Crush Saga.

I have spent over three years working on this game as an independent app developer. I learned how to code on my own after my mother passed and CandySwipe was my first and most successful game; it’s my livelihood, and you are now attempting to take that away from me. You have taken away the possibility of CandySwipe blossoming into what it has the potential of becoming. I have been quiet, not to exploit the situation, hoping that both sides could agree on a peaceful resolution. However, your move to buy a trademark for the sole purpose of getting away with infringing on the CandySwipe trademark and goodwill just sickens me.

This also contradicts your recent quote by Riccardo in ‘An open letter on intellectual property’ posted on your website which states, ‘We believe in a thriving game development community, and believe that good game developers – both small and large – have every right to protect the hard work they do and the games they create.’

I myself was only trying to protect my hard work.

I wanted to take this moment to write you this letter so that you know who I am. Because I now know exactly what you are. Congratulations on your success!

Sincerely,
Albert Ransom
President (Founder), Runsome Apps Inc.

This just goes to show that King do not care who they stamp on or who they anger, so long as they get exactly what they want, which sadly, they have done so. 

I wrote this post because I wanted you to know exactly who King games are and what they are capable of doing to get what they want. I just hope that, if you are a player of Candy Crush, you take into consideration the information you have read and remember who the original creator of it was.